Wednesday, March 2, 2016

BUG-OUT BIKE

A TWO-WHEELED SOLUTION TO A CROSS-COUNTRY SHTF PROBLEM
Written by OFFGRID STAFF on October 16, 2015


Very Informative Link:

With the uncertainty of our economy and questionable things our government says and does to other countries, either the collapse will materialize, civil riots or with technology as it’s shared globally an EMP attack or a nuke set off in New York City by a rogue nation are possible. We’re getting uncomfortably close.

You have been prepping for just such a time when you must abandon your home or residence and get out of town for your own safety, to a safe secure area better known as your ‘retreat’. Your retreat is a place/destination known in advance that has about a year of food/supplies and an RV or cabin already there for your shelter.

One huge issue when trying to Bug Out is everyone else is also trying to get out.
My living in hurricane country has shown me first hand what it’s like when the government decides to issue an evac order to move just 100,000 people. The 3-4 evacuation routes are immediately clogged to a stand still. Vehicle break downs and most common, running out of gas. Myself, I avoid that mess by watching to hurricane forecasts (NOAA) and leaving a couple days earlier than the order. If the hurricane turns away good, I just had a mini vacation.

A Motorcycle as a Bug Out Vehicle?
When the roads are clogged a motorcycle can ride down the medians, the roads shoulder, cutting across farm fields, ride on sidewalks, ditches, etc. The Link above will take you to a detailed outline of how to make the motorcycle do the job.



9 comments:

  1. Reminds me that I need to ask hubby about the Honda 70 he bought a couple of years back that needed some work done. We bought it just for this purpose & to maybe tool around the farm with a bit.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A trailer would certainly work if you were only traveling smooth paved roads. But even then, if you open the link below you will see a Florida evacuation. You would have to navigate between all the stalled or stopped traffic the trailer would be a detriment. Once you get of the roads and onto hiking trails or no-trails, or 45 degree side angled trails the trailer would be impossible to control.

      http://www.grabpak.com/10-evacuation-escape-route-tips-how-to-avoid-being-trapped-with-the-masses/

      Delete
  2. I'm thinking a quad runner would have advantages. Carry more payload-a passenger in a pinch, less danger of falling over,easier platform to shoot from if it came down to it. My dirtbike days are past unfortunately but I ain't giving up quite yet!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A quad would have some advantages depending where you live, such as a lot of wide open flat spaces to use instead of the roads. But if you must navigate through the traffic pictured in the link below. It would take some hard thinking and route planning to make it work. Also when you at the photo in the link below with a cycle you could muscle it up and over concrete barriers and be on your way, with the quad probably not.

      http://www.grabpak.com/10-evacuation-escape-route-tips-how-to-avoid-being-trapped-with-the-masses/

      Delete
  3. I wonder about a trailer being towed behind as a possibility? Is there a single wheeled trailer that could track the bike? How much would a small trailer impede a bike's versatility? How much could it enhance what you can take with you?

    ReplyDelete
  4. Sure fixing the scooter would give him another project Ha! But yes it would be fun to have and save a lot of walking. A golf cart with a utility bed in back works very well also for running around the property with tools, fertilizer and supplies in the back.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Great things to think about...that picture could have been Houston during our Hurricane Rita evacuation. It was insane. I like the idea reminder to get out earlier if possible. Now that we have the farm as our bug out location, we need to remember to keep an eye on events as they are developing and make a plan to be ready to leave sooner....

    ReplyDelete
  6. One bad thing about traveling cross country is that in unfamiliar surroundings, the rider has to pay strict attention to where they are going. You never know if a rock or path drop is coming up. And sound - some of those engines can be heard a long way off.

    But a lot to be recommended otherwise and well worth thinking about. Thank you for the link .

    ReplyDelete
  7. About ten years ago, a friend told me that the Kawasaki KLR 650 would be a perfect survival bike. Two years later I got one. I'd be more inclined to get one a bit lighter, but It works well hauling stuff. Happy Trails panniers and a tank bag. 48 mpg with a 6 gallon tank.
    I can imagine what things would be like if the Cascadia subduction zone slipped. No road in the area would be passable in the lowlands due to slides from the earthquake, mayhem in the the tidewaters from the Tsunami. So, in addition to that, I have a small skiff, a 4x4 pickup, and a VW Camper van. All useful vehicles. The Mercedes will just have to stay in the garage. I don't really plan on going anywhere to begin with. The mini ranch is prepped to the max. As long as the house doesn't slide down the hill into the bay, we should be good.

    ReplyDelete

Your thoughts are welcome!