Monday, July 4, 2016

IOSAT Pills


For a Nuclear Release Accident or on Purpose.


Purchased 6-25-16


IOSAT pills: (aka ‘KI’)
I have been putting off buying them for no logical reason, just they’re at the end of my need to have list. I live within a few miles from three Navy Nuke bases and down wind of several nuke generating plants. Because of the bases and reactors proximity the pills should have been at the top of my list. Almost all our reactor generating facilities are well past their prime condition and not surprising under influence of political Super PAC money. A combination almost guaranteeing accidents such as; Chernobyl, Three Mile Island and Fukushima to name a few. No doubt many more accidents or destructive opportunities are in the future, especially with N. Korea and Middle East countries having the ability to either buy, make and deliver nukes be it a destructive bombing of a reactor causing a release or simply a dirty bomb.

IOSAT pills are very cheap at $6.50 for 14 pills or $13.00 for two adult people for 14 days and longer (smaller dosage) for children. The shelf life advertised is seven (7) years and dosing one pill, once a day (24 hours) as recommended gives you 14 days to escape the contaminated area.


Where I purchased them link:


And more information to answer any questions you may have about “KI” pills!

Q&A about IOSAT from the NRC link:


Consumer Package Insert Says:
IOSATTM  (Potassium Iodide Tablets USP, 130 mg) (Abbreviated KI) 

Take potassium iodide (KI) only when public officials tell you. In a nuclear radiation emergency, radioactive iodine could be released into the air. KI protects only the thyroid gland from uptake of radioactive iodine. Therefore, KI should be used along with other emergency measures that will be recommended to you by public officials. If you are told to take this medicine, take it 1 time every 24 hours. Do not take it more often. More KI will not help you. Too much KI may increase the chances of side effects. Do not take this medicine if you know you are allergic to iodine (see SIDE EFFECTS below). 

DESCRIPTION: 
Each white, round, cross-scored—the name IOSAT stamped on one side—tablet contains 130 mg of potassium iodide. 

INDICATIONS 
IOSAT (Potassium iodide tablet, USP) is a thyroid blocking medicine that is used in a nuclear radiation emergency only. 

DIRECTIONS FOR USE 
Use only as directed by public officials if a nuclear radiation emergency happens. 

Dose: 
Adults over 18 years:   
1 tablet (whole or crushed) every day (130 mg) 

Children over 12 years to 18 years:
1 tablet (whole or crushed) every day (130 mg) who weigh at least 150 pounds 

Children over 12 years to 18 years:
1/2 tablet (whole or crushed) or 4 teaspoonfuls  who weigh less than 150 pounds  every day (65 mg)   

Children over 3 years to 12 years:
1/2 tablet (whole or crushed) or 4 teaspoonfuls  every day (65 mg) 

Children over 1 month to 3 years:
2 teaspoonfuls every day (32.5 mg) 

Babies at birth to 1 month:
1 teaspoonful every day (16.25 mg)  

Tablets can be crushed and mixed in many liquids. To take the tablet in liquid solution, use dosing directions under Making a Potassium Iodide Liquid Mixture. 

Take KI every day (every 24 hours) as directed by public officials. Do not take more than 1 dose in 24 hours. More will not help you. Too much medicine may increase the chances of side effects. 

Making a Potassium Iodide Liquid Mixture: 
1. Put one 130 mg KI tablet into a small bowl and grind it into a fine powder using the back of a metal   teaspoon against the inside of the bowl. The powder should not have any large pieces.
2. Add 4 teaspoonfuls of water to the crushed KI powder in the bowl and mix until the KI powder is dissolved in the water.
3. Take the KI water mixture solution made in step 2 and mix it with 4 teaspoonfuls of low fat white or  chocolate milk, orange juice, flat soda, raspberry syrup, or infant formula.
4. The KI liquid mixture will keep for up to 7 days in the refrigerator. It is recommended that the KI liquid  mixtures be prepared weekly. Throw away unused portions. 

The amount of KI (130 mg tablet) in the drink when mixed as described above is 16.25 mg per teaspoonful. The number of teaspoonfuls of the drink to give your child depends on your child’s age as described in the following table: 

Child’s Age Give your child this amount in teaspoonfuls.

Over 12 to 18 years old:
4 teaspoonfuls will give you a 65 mg dose who weigh less than 150 pounds 

Over 3 to 12 years old: 4 teaspoonfuls will give you a 65 mg dose 

Over 1 month to 3 years old: 2 teaspoonfuls will give you a 32.5 mg dose

Birth to 1 month: 1 teaspoonful will give you a 16.25 mg dose  

Note: This is the amount to give your child for one single dose in teaspoonfuls (not tablespoonfuls). You should give your child one dose each day as recommended by the public officials. 

Pregnant or breastfeeding women or babies under 1 month of age: Take as directed above and call a doctor as soon as possible. Repeat dosing should be avoided. It is recommended that thyroid function be checked in babies less than 1 month of age that take KI. Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding should also be checked by a doctor if repeat dosing is necessary. Although these precautions should be taken, the benefits of short-term use of KI to block uptake of radioactive iodine by the thyroid gland far exceed its chances of side effects.

Patients with thyroid disease: If you have both a nodular thyroid condition such as multinodular goiter with heart disease, you should not take KI. Patients with other thyroid conditions may take KI as directed above, but call a doctor if you need to take KI for more than a few days. 

WARNING 
People who are allergic to iodine, have dermatitis herpetiformis or hypocomplementemic vasculitis, or have nodular thyroid disease with heart disease should not take KI. Keep out of the reach of children. In case of an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing, speaking or swallowing; wheezing; shortness of breath or swelling of the mouth or throat), call 911 or get medical care right away. In case of overdose, get medical help or call a Poison Control Center right away. 

HOW POTASSIUM IODIDE WORKS 
Certain forms of iodine help your thyroid gland work right. Most people get the iodine they need from foods like iodized salt or fish. The thyroid can “store” or hold only a certain amount of iodine. 

In a nuclear radiation emergency, radioactive iodine may be released in the air. This material may be breathed or swallowed. It may enter the thyroid gland and damage it. The damage would probably not show itself for years. Children are most likely to have thyroid damage. If you take KI, it will block or reduce the chances that radioactive iodine will enter your thyroid gland.

WHO SHOULD NOT TAKE POTASSIUM IODIDE 
People should avoid KI if they are allergic to iodine, have dermatitis herpetiformis or hypocomplementemic vasculitis, or have nodular thyroid disease with heart disease, because these conditions may increase the chances of side effects to iodine. 

HOW AND WHEN TO TAKE POTASSIUM IODIDE 
KI should be taken as soon as possible after public officials tell you. If you are told to repeat the dose, you should take the second dose 24 hours after the first dose. Do not take it sooner. More KI will not help you because the thyroid can “hold” only certain amounts of iodine. Taking more than 1 dose per day will increase the chances of side effects. The public officials will tell you how many days to take KI. You should take KI until the chances of major exposure to radioactive iodine by breathing or swallowing stops. 

SIDE EFFECTS 
Short-term use of KI at the recommended dose is safe. You should not take this drug for longer than you are told. 

Possible side effects include: swelling of the salivary glands, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach ache, fever, headache, metallic taste, and allergic reactions. Allergic reactions can include 
• skin rashes such as hives
• swelling of various parts of the body such as the face, lips, tongue, throat, hands or feet
• fever with joint pain
• trouble breathing, speaking or swallowing
• wheezing or shortness of breath Get medical attention right away if you have trouble breathing, speaking or swallowing; wheezing; shortness of breath; or swelling of the mouth, tongue or throat. 

Taking iodide, in rare cases, may cause over activity of the thyroid gland, under activity of the thyroid gland, or enlargement of the thyroid gland (goiter). Symptoms of an overactive thyroid gland may include an irregular heart beat and chest pain. Patients with thyroid disease are more likely to get these side effects. Babies under 1 month of age are more likely to get an under active thyroid gland (hypothyroidism).  

WHAT TO DO IF SIDE EFFECTS OCCUR 
Stop taking KI and call a doctor if you have one or more of the following symptoms: 
• swelling of the face, hands or feet
• fever and joint pain
• skin rash 

Stop taking KI and get medical help right away if you have one or more of the following symptoms:
• trouble breathing, speaking or swallowing
• shortness of breath or wheezing
• swelling of the lips, tongue or throat
• irregular heart beat or chest pain 
HOW SUPPLIED 
Potassium iodide tablets, USP. Packages of 14 tablets. Each white, round, cross-scored tablet contains 130 mg potassium iodide. Store at 20-25° C (68-77° F).  Keep dry and foil intact. 


Distributed by: Anbex Inc.  10 East 40th Street 25th Floor New York, NY  10016 www.anbex.com

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